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Dividing household items & personal belongings in a divorce

The most important assets that need to be divided up during divorce normally consist of the matrimonial home and other property, along with pensions, savings, and any business assets.

But what happens to personal belongings and household items when it comes to divorce? We cover this and more in our article to help you understand your options when it comes to splitting possessions.

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    Frequently Asked Questions

    Decisions about furniture and white goods?

    Often one of the divorcing parties will remain living in the matrimonial home as part of the overall financial settlement.

    In this scenario, it will often make sense to leave the furniture and white goods in the existing property, possibly adjusting the settlement slightly to take account of the value of these goods.

    Sorting out jewellery, paintings, and collectibles?

    Chattels which have significant financial value may be more contentious and are more often fought over during a divorce. It will sometimes be necessary to sell or auction these off and split the proceeds.

    Alternatively, if one party decides to keep the chattel of value, this could mean the other party receives an equivalent value of something else, such as joint savings.

    What can I do if my ex has taken what I wanted to keep?

    If the divorcing couple is already living separately, it may be that certain household items have already been removed from the matrimonial home (ie one party might have taken some possessions to their new home).

    In this scenario, if certain household items have been taken by the party who has moved out, it can be extremely difficult to recover these chattels – and if they are of low commercial value it is unlikely that a family court will get involved.

    The best way to resolve this kind of dispute is through negotiation between the two parties – possibly using formal mediation methods.

    Will the courts help us to decide who gets what?

    The family courts are generally reluctant to get involved with disputes about ownership of household items during the divorce process, especially if they are of little financial value and therefore do not have a significant impact on the overall matrimonial pot.

    If the courts are forced to decide, they will generally just divide items arbitrarily or order an auction to achieve a 50:50 split, which is why it’s always advisable to agree on your financial agreement without the help of the court.

    How we can help you

    Protect your assets with a prenup

    OR

    Get help splitting your finances

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