Social Media is a Factor in One-in-Three Divorces

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Facebook and other social media outlets are playing an increasing part in divorce actions. Postings not only contribute to marital problems but also serve as divorce trial evidence in determining financial and child custody settlements.

As more and more people invite social media into their lives, research increasingly shows that chatting, flirting and interacting with online friends is contributing to a growing number of divorces.

According to Telegraph.co.uk, Facebook has become a “virtual third party” in divorce petitions. “Facebook is being blamed for an increasing number of marital breakdowns, and it is quite remarkable that all the petitions that I have seen here since May have cited Facebook one way or another,” said attorney Emma Patel.

A recent poll indicates that a third of all English divorces in 2011 cited Facebook as a contributing factor, according to an article by Forbes.com. The 5,000 people polled listed a number of ways that Facebook activity played a part in their divorce. Reasons included sharing details of a spouse’s behavior, making negative remarks about a spouse and communicating inappropriately with someone of the opposite sex.

Experts speculate that as the use of social media becomes more pervasive, people lose touch with its public nature, and tend to interact too spontaneously with online friends, sharing thoughts as one would in a private conversation. However, the intimate information shared with these “friends” may seriously damage relationships when exposed to public examination, particularly when marital problems arise.

“People need to be careful what they write on their walls, as the courts are seeing these posts being used in financial disputes and children cases as evidence,” said Mark Keenan, a spokesman for Divorce-Online.

Social media users are encouraged to think twice about posting private information that may be used against them in divorce proceedings. Whether Facebook or other social media played a role in your marriage or not, speak with an experienced divorce attorney in Virginia.

Article provided by Barnes & Diehl, P.C.

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Mark Keenan

About Mark Keenan

Editor of the Divorce Online blog

  • [...] in the divorce rate. In 2009, 1-in-5 divorces were blamed on social media cheating, now in 2012 1-in-3 divorces are blamed on social media. With social media easily at everyone’s fingertips, cyber [...]

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